Sixth grade indoor archaeological dig

Over the past month, students in sixth-grade history have been learning to think, dig, and document like archaeologists by conducting an indoor archaeological dig in the new Lower School’s Innovation Lab. In groups of three or four, students practice their excavation and documentation skills by gradually uncovering and recording artifacts hidden within their team’s bin.

Their goals are to be methodical in their excavation and detailed in their record-keeping, then to use their findings to develop a theory about the “story” of their dig site, including the location, time period, and historical activities that might have taken place. They will display their documentation and findings in team binders and in short presentations to their classmates.

In early November, students took a break from their excavation work for a day when they were treated to a visit from local archaeologist—and alumna!—Megan Theriault ’05, who presented about her own digs and findings here in Maine. Students were able to hold and examine artifacts, including many arrow and spearheads, as well as a 9,000-year-old whetstone.

Click here to see a photo gallery of the sixth-grade history indoor archaeological dig.